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7f we are infornicd tliat the Professor ^' is convinced that houus and verbs were originally separate and independaut words with distinct acceptations." A most notable discovery. Rector ^) restraineth and barreth his farder incroaching that way.' It was, probably, in consequence of this notion, that 4he inhabitants thinking such situation secure, removed their church ionly about SOO yards, it being on the opposite side of a brook : in the old church was the shrine of St. We have general grounds for referring to its co-operation all oor better emo- tions, all our purer in;clinations# Bv^t sti U no ordinary Christian is authorized UOyly on Assurance.

Dunbar should be surprized in such an inaccuracy^ In p. ^ Trtlhffmry fie town by the ri- ver, Trevydrarif the town by the • brainbly river. Let a peri»on of an enthueiastic turn of mind once be* come convinced that he ought, under particular circumstances, to experience soiiie particular feelings, and hs of the Spirit are bestowed on Christiaite is the measure in wl^ch they anre deserved, is most sound and scriptural doctrine.

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*' To me, indeed, I frankly avow, the principle of malntaloing Order and regularity in the church, by the casual and indiscrin£ Dating agency of the common informer, appears to be founded on e Qm|i|^ sfiisconception and ignorance of the nature and ends of eccvsiasticai government and discipline. We now pro- ceed to c^l I a few flowers from his English. •' that the whole body of Homer's poems pre^ent^ even at this distant period, no very iiiporrect speciinfn of whi^t they were ia ancient times. Johnson properly defines a specimen to be '* a part of any thing exhibited, that the resit may be known.*^ Now certainly as the lliadi m its preser^t state;, contains a goo4 deal more thap Homer himself wrote^ it can scarcely be called a specimen of that poem. - * *.* *eipg convinced by the pr*^ ceding extract that these great and important schools would not have found^a-ntorc pious or hearty advocate than the worthy 9e-* cretary whp thus undertook their cause. The Apostle, in this part of his epietle, is exhorting the Christians whom he address* ed, to bring forth the genuine fruits of their faith, by living, not after the flesh, but after the spirit.

468 Storer's History of British Catfiedrals .......... Lietter to ttie bnke of Kent, on Con- sinnptiito .... Upon a point connected with this system, the Bishop speaks with a high view;^of ecclesiasti(»l po Uty, worthy even of Hooker himself. ** The ordinary description of week-day^ or Sunday, Charity Schools , in which poor Childrien are habituated to an attendance upon instruction, is well calculated to answer these* ends, and has unquestionably been productive of incalculable good, in various ways, t6 the Children themselves, and of relief and comfort to their indigent parents and relatives. thei»* selves into the belief tihat they rea Uy feel this assurance, will too- easily be fiiled with spiritual: arrogance and presumptio^^ andae^' daced^into the most dangerous of all states,: a state of false security', respecting their prospects of final salvetion«^' JP.. from' its - context, and alleged as an undoubted proof that the Holy Spirit •Mi^M*rf W.lifc^* • Ch. Btit, a very slight consideration of this text, when viewed as it stands in the writing of the Apostle, will prove to us that its real meaning is widely different from that which has been stated.

by Cfpel Lqfd 262 Laurence's TABLE OF BOOKS REVIEWED. Sermon on Baptismal Regeneration 549 Le^ures on Apocalyticul Epistle S) by Kittle 300 ■■■ y Bampto Hy by Dr. Has he heard nothing of thd Eleati inscription^ found by Sir W. account of an excursion in 1755, speaks of it * as being then in no little danger,^ the sands being spread all around it.* It stood among the sand-hills, with only a solitary cottage near it, half buried In sand, and the porch frequently so blocked up that it was difficult to obtain en« trance ; it was determined therefore, about ten years ago, to build a liew church near the village of Lambourn, and the centre of thi^ Ctrish. \yhen we visited Perran-Sabuloe in that year, the fomier church, which had been unroofed was nearly filled with sand.'' P. Had the etymology of the names of places been inserted^ as they occurred^ it would have been a useful and pleasant addi«» tio D« This omission, indeed, is much to be regretted, as the old Cornish names are, for the most part, accurately descriptive of the places themselves, and not unfrequendy present a local mi- mature to the mind's eye ', many of the following terms will folly justify our remark : Bumuka Uf the high hil L Treoerbynj the dwelling on the hill. Thus thea no one can be positively certain that he receives a particular im«^.

70 Letter to the Duke of Kent, on Consumption, by Dr. Will it be credited that any one, who calls himself a Greek Professor, should have sufiered to escape him such a mixture of positiveness and ignorance as is contained in the following words, p. " But even though the digamma or Ionic vau have been used by the Greeks, still I asseit that it must have disappeared before the time of Homer." tiysom* Magna Br Unnmg, Cofmma^ t% What docs he mean hy disappearing f Have we not the express testimony of the ancient grammarian Trypho, that Alcaeus wrote Fp^if for pin^s} Did he never hear of the De Kan marble^ in whicli are the words TO AFYTOAie O ? Piran in which his relics were fcareftllly preserved : there was a great resort of Pilgrims to make oblations at this shrine, as appears by a deed in the registry of the see of Exeter, bearing date i4e H5» The brook above-mentioned* having been dried up by the adits made from time to time for the purpose of working the mines, the new church lost all the protec- tioii it could have derived from it and Borlase ; in a MS. 85 gathorized by Scripture to refer this or tl)at particular feeling of his mind, decidedly and unequivocally, to the Holy Spirit.

Rodd 207 Sortes Horatian8e» a Poem 204 Southcote, Johanna, Ma- thias's Case of S23 Southtey*^ Roderick, the last of the Goths, a Poem. and carriea with it the knowledge anc| arts which hsid previously established in those countries.'' Here is a confusion of metaphors, which* strictly speaking, means that the arts were carried away from Thessaly^ &c. 5^ we have the following spirited question : '^ Was it surprising tfaeuj^ that the language of poetry should have been cultivated, eveu before Homer's time, to an amazing degree, &c P Whatever was amazing, was surprizing; and are amazed that Mr. It solely and entirely refers to the general assuvance Which all Christians have, an assurance built in their hearts and co Bsdences by fait^ in the promises and reliance on the merits of Christ, and coiifirmed by the encouraging influence of the Holy Spirit, that, if they perform the duties which their religion requires^ they will be feeeived as the adopted sons of God, md rewarded With admiission /into thi^ glorious inheritance vfhich He has pro- mised to his obedient servants.'' F. ' This Purvey €^.context is uoiyersally avoided by all live disciples of enthusiasm^ to whom t^ rules of reason- and the t^Ws of interpretation^ w^ tieggdrly elcma Us, to whose ardour the J/ 6 2 rapid Bi i*Oi/Ii/ 'on Jss Uranci, ; rapid quotation of insultited texts is far more congenia T (ban « and tedious consideration of a long chapter. the truth and reality of which may be doubted upon the follow- • «^g ground*. ^* For, in the first place, it is a fact no les« confirmed by general ^^perience, tliaii singular in its nature, that the feelings of men in genera], abd especially of those whose temperaroent is warm and ' enthosfastic; are extremely delusive, and can .never be^ trusted s» * as to afford a proof of any position or opinion which the individual ' tnaintarns..